Where do you want to travel?

Your journey will lead you to famous domestic and foreign beauty spots.

There she blows! Nakalele Blowhole, Maui

Description: A high performing blowhole sitting at the ocean’s edge surrounded by surreal landscape.
Downside: Can be extremely dangerous if you get too close.
How to Get There: To get to the Nakalele Blowhole, take Honoapiilani Highway (Highway 30) north, past Kapalua located in West Maui. Take Highway 30 until you hit Kahekili Highway, also known as Highway 340. Once you are on Highway 340, drive ½ a mile past the parking lot at the 38-mile marker, to a wide turnout with rounded boulders behind it. The trail to the Nakalele Blowhole begins at the turnout, leading slightly to the left and down to the ocean. Bring appropriate hiking gear, DO NOT wear flip flops, sun protection, food, water, and a camera or video camera if you want to capture some awesome footage.

Adventure Details:
I had only seen one other blowhole in my life; La Bufadora in Ensenada, Mexico. Once I came to Maui, I had heard about the Nakalele Blowhole, an incredible act of nature, and I could not wait to see it. The great thing about Nakalele is that it is not a huge tourist attraction, so I could go there without having to worry about getting a close view with hundreds of sightseers around. Also, the drive to the Nakalele Blowhole is along the coastline and beautiful.

Warning sign at Nakalele Blowhole in Maui

Warning sign at Nakalele Blowhole in Maui

All blowholes come from, of course, a hole in the ground that usually spits up a large amount of water. The hole connects to what is essentially an underground ocean cave. Because of the shape of the ‘cave’ and its position about the hole, whenever a strong wave pushes itself into it, the water comes barreling out of the hole. Sometimes, you never know how strong the force will be, so please use your common sense when visiting Nakalele. People have lost their lives here, and although it is rare, it can still happen if you venture too close.

Hard lava surrounds the Nakalele Blowhole, and it is extremely unpredictable when it comes to the show. When the tide is high, and the surf is rough, you will see a massive amount of water shooting straight up into the air. Other times, when you think that it won’t release much water at all, you can be pleasantly (or unpleasantly) surprised. However, if you want to see some action, it is best to go in the wintertime when the waves are pumping hard into the blowhole. In addition to the fascination that comes with the Nakalele Blowhole, the area to the left of it makes for a truly unique, but nonetheless, beautiful landscape. That’s because every time water escape from the blowhole, various elements gets sprayed far and wide among the rocks, creating holes in the rocks and a scene that looks like something that should belong on another planet.

Trailhead leading down to Nakalele Blowhole

Trailhead leading down to Nakalele Blowhole

When I arrived at the trail leading to the Nakalele Blowhole, I have to say; I didn’t expect the hike down to be as challenging as it was. It was a little over a mile round trip, which although isn’t too long, is on a pretty rough terrain. It didn’t bother me, though, because the hike down was mind-blowing. The ground looked like something that you might see on Mars, with its dry, rugged coastline against the backdrop of the pristine ocean.

Nakalele Blowhole shooting 70 feet into the air

Nakalele Blowhole shooting 70 feet into the air

The Nakalele Blowhole did not disappoint when I arrived, certainly setting the bar high for other scenes of nature in Maui. I couldn’t believe my eyes when the blowhole was shooting up to 70 feet high every few minutes. It was like she was waiting for me to arrive to impress me with her showcase. The water was explosive when it came out. I imagined that it was a good example of what a volcano was spewing out lava might look like, but obviously on a much smaller level. Every time the water shot out through the blowhole, I could hear and feel the ground rumbling beneath me. It almost sounded like the jet engines of an airplane when it’s getting ready for take-off.

Heart shape in the lava rock adjacent to Nakalele Blowhole

Heart shape in the lava rock adjacent to Nakalele Blowhole

Although I was enjoying everything, I was careful not to get too close to Nakalele Blowhole. However, I was close enough that I got completely drenched every time the water shot out. Nearby, I saw crabs crawling around the wet areas of the blowhole. They seemed to be enjoying themselves, too. Adjacent to Nakalele Blowhole about 50 feet, I noticed a beautiful heart-shaped hole cut out of the lava rock. Be sure not to miss this!

Acid warzone at Nakalele Blowhole, Maui

Acid warzone at Nakalele Blowhole, Maui

As mentioned before, the landscape surrounding the blowhole is indescribable. However, it has been given the name ‘Acid War Zone’, as the barren grounds contain massive boulders that have been very intricately pock-marked, sculpted, and dramatically eroded from each and every time the salt water sprayed out, falling upon the rocks.

That day, everything came together, and I saw everything I wanted to see. It was almost magical.

Have you been to Nakalele Blowhole? Comment below and let us know so we can Go! See! Learn!

User Ratings : 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Michelle Rae

Michelle Rae

Michelle Rae is the creator of The Traveling Vixen, which captures her adventures around the world. Her passion is to inspire others to grow by experiencing and learning new things in the world.

2 Comments

  • mom

    this blog is wonderful, not only the pictures are beautiful, but your describing the
    area and blow hole is very real, to me felt like I was there except for the water spray
    hitting me. area looks like a distant planet………thanks for the trip

    June 3, 2016 at 1:38 am
    • Michelle Rae
      Michelle Rae

      Thank you! I wish I was back there now. 🙂

      June 3, 2016 at 3:10 am

LEAVE A COMMENT

*